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The Opposite of Fitts' Law


#122

In soviet Russia, Sukhoi Su-30 flies you, dog.


#123

Posting a comment to try to close David Kra’s <b> tag, which is really bothering me. It might not work.


#124

Another example of ejector seat vs. FM Radio is Google Chrome. Ctrl+Shift+Tab switches to the previous tab. Ctrl+Shift+Q… closes Chrome. Not just current window, but all windows. Without asking for any confirmation. Without even any warning. Basically, what it does is even worse than Chrome crash, because after crash, there is an option to restore all your tabs.
Users have been complaining about it for ages, yet nobody from Chrome team seems to care. They definitely didn’t hear of the opposite of Fitts law!

What’s especially odd is that the point of ejector seat is at least clear; ejector seat button is actually required. Keyboard shortcut “close all tabs in all windows”? Not so much.


#125

What do you mean? That’s just the hotkey to close Chrome. It doesn’t make it forget your session or anything: it’s the same as picking exit from the menu.

Given that closing Chrome is trivially reversed by starting it again, I definitely wouldn’t want to be annoyed by a prompt when trying to close the browser.

(Okay, it can be a bit annoying in that Chrome is slow enough that reloading your 150 tabs could take a while, but quitting by mistake is something that happens very rarely compared to quitting intentionally, so it makes sense to optimise for the common case by not popping up a prompt that’s nearly never useful.)


#126

That’s just the hotkey to close Chrome. It doesn’t make it forget your session or anything

It does make Chrome forget all state of the opened tabs. It does make Chrome forget everything that you have opened in an incognito window. It does make Chrome forget everything that you were entering in a text field somewhere. And it so happens that I’m most frequently switch between tabs when I’m doing some research (mostly in incognito window to avoid polluting my cookies) to write some post somewhere. So, when Chrome exits, it is most likely that I have some long post with a lot of references written and not saved, and a lot of other references opened in an incognito window, and all of that (which is hours of work) is lost on exit. Granted that’s my way of working, but still.
And also, as you have mentioned, it does interrupt my workflow by using 100% of CPU for, like, ten minutes while it reloads all my tabs. That’s if I’m lucky, and I’m connected to a broadband network at the moment; otherwise, it just consumes all my mobile internet allowance, and does not load anything.

quitting by mistake is something that happens very rarely compared to quitting intentionally

Quitting it by mistake is something that happens every time I want to switch to the previous tab (hundreds of times per day) and accidentally press Q instead of Tab.
Quitting it intentionally is something that never happens. I guess that probably somewhere out there is a person who really needs “exit chrome” feature, and even needs a hotkey for this feature, but I am not this person, and neither is anyone I know.

It is an ejector seat in its pure form. Surely, ejecting is trivially reversed by travelling back to base and launching another aircraft, pilots definitely wouldn’t want to be annoyed by a prompt when trying to eject themselves by pressing the button located next to the “FM radio” one.


#127

I dunno, it is a pathology all its own to have 150 browser tabs open. Surely there is some other alternative workflow possible here that does not involve “losing” or opening that many tabs at once?


#128

Not only that – adding confirmation prompt means that if Chrome is running, when you try to shut down your OS, Chrome will block the shutdown! Def a usability anti-pattern, IMHO.